Saturday, September 27, 2008

everything i know about blogs ...

I learned from blogging. Well, sort of.

Here's how Technorati defines the blogosphere: The ecosystem of interconnected communities of bloggers and readers at the convergence of journalism and conversation.

This came up about a month ago in a conversation about "quick-click journalism" that made our heads hurt. (check the comments) As i wrote then, primordial soup: You gotta wonder if, as the blog world continues to expand and evolve, if various distinct "neighborhoods" will take shape. Will there be boundaries? Should there be? With rules? Will that change the nature of the blogosphere itself? And what about protections? That came up a month ago to, with regard to a post (and comments) about Josh Wolf.

Interesting to watch how this will play out, yeah? Your guess being as good as mind, let me know what you think.

Meanwhile, you can find Technorati's complete State of the Blogosphere/2008 here.

From that report:
"But as the Blogosphere grows in size and influence, the lines between what is a blog and what is a mainstream media site become less clear. Larger blogs are taking on more characteristics of mainstream sites and mainstream sites are incorporating styles and formats from the Blogosphere. In fact, 95% of the top 100 US newspapers have reporter blogs."

3 comments:

Nicole said...

The future of blogs and their influence is definitely fascinating. In ten years, will kids be able to tell the difference between a technologically advanced blog and a legitimate online news source? Which will we trust more?

themaykazine.com said...

Blogs can be as credible as newspapers. Being in print doesn't add any extra verification to any written report. Indie magazines are printed, but you'll see more sources quoting Huffington Post than a zine. It's about the writers (and IT security, of course).

Thought you'd find this article interesting: http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2007/mar/15/comment.media

Megan Mills said...

I think that blogs can definitely be as informative and educational as newspaper and magazine articles. One thing I have been taught in my years as a Communication major, however, is to be extra careful when reading a blog. There is a chance that all of the facts are true and all of the names and towns spelled correctly, but there is definitely more room for error in the blogging world than mainstream media. Blogging is not as censored and edited as other mainstream media. When reading a blog, it is crucial to make certain that the evidence and facts are actually legitimate ones.

It is also interesting to discuss the future of the media and the online world. The online world is taking off, and now journalists are expected to be able to write an article as well as make an online version of it, which usually includes voice overs and video footage. I think blogging is going to take off in the near future, if it hasn't already. And journalists are going to be trained in new and technologically savvy ways as we become an even more advanced society.

mem